Sprint 3 Retrospective

https://gitlab.com/LibreFoodPantry/client-solutions/theas-pantry/guestinfosystem/community/-/issues/38

Implementing the frontend for guest registration was the overarching goal of mine during the sprint; this encompassed all of the smaller individual parts.

https://gitlab.com/LibreFoodPantry/client-solutions/theas-pantry/guestinfosystem/community/-/issues/53

This was fulfilling the specifications for the guest registration page, including collecting a new guest’s information and displaying/changing an already registered guest’s information.

https://gitlab.com/LibreFoodPantry/client-solutions/theas-pantry/guestinfosystem/community/-/issues/41

This was in order to allow ID input from a card scanner swipe (within a text entry of the frontend page)

https://gitlab.com/LibreFoodPantry/client-solutions/theas-pantry/guestinfosystem/community/-/issues/52

This was collecting a guest ID for lookup; employed the getGuest method, which made a backend request for a guest with the specific ID.

https://gitlab.com/LibreFoodPantry/client-solutions/theas-pantry/guestinfosystem/community/-/issues/49

This was connecting frontend to backend methods, which was completed with the use of Axios.

https://gitlab.com/LibreFoodPantry/client-solutions/theas-pantry/guestinfosystem/community/-/issues/29

This was creating the HTML structuring for the guest info page.

https://gitlab.com/LibreFoodPantry/client-solutions/theas-pantry/guestinfosystem/community/-/issues/30

This was applying CSS styling for the guest info page; not much was completed here except for button styling and putting individual borders around each entry for the age of a member of the household.

https://gitlab.com/LibreFoodPantry/client-solutions/theas-pantry/guestinfosystem/backend/-/issues/6

This was changing the backend getGuest method in order to return an empty object in the case of no guest found instead of a 404 status. Also, not totally included in this but involved is the refactoring of the guest object in the backend openapi.yaml file to match what was best for frontend functionality.

Overall, I feel I was able to get a substantial amount of work done during this sprint. Actually, I felt this was the most I got done in any sprint. I think part of this was feeling totally settled into the sprint cycle but also because I was undertaking something I had never done before in building the frontend for the system, which was a very large part of the system and had a limited number of examples to work off of (at least, examples that were applicable). Not only was I having to learn on the fly, but I also had to then apply this knowledge to HTML and CSS (totally new to me, only having lightly dabbled in HTML) and JS (very limited experience as well). Getting through this was difficult, and I definitely should have asked for more help earlier on.

This was actually my main downfall during the sprint; I was trying to figure things out on my own for so long that later on, when help was needed the most, I felt there was not a good way to delineate the work, especially because it would take a great deal of time to explain the functionality of everything up to that point. More communication was definitely necessary. I felt during this sprint, our team was the most divided amongst their own work, with limited crossover, so communication suffered and sometimes it seemed work might be stagnating.

As a team, I still think we worked well. Although there were rough patches and points where I wasn’t sure how we would get to our respective endpoints, I think we did fairly well. Had we teamed up on more work, I think we could have gotten through cards/tasks faster. I also think there could have been a better division of labor. I felt the frontend was too large a task for me to be completing on my own, but there were other circumstances. I was the one who studied Vue.js, so I don’t know how much knowledge others had. Also, I should have been more vocal in asking for help once I realized the size of the task I was taking on. Better communication on a more consistent basis would have solved this, I believe.

Personally, I was happy with the work I completed. I went from feeling lost on most parts of the frontend to having some solid understanding of each part. This was good for my sake, but not optimal for delivering working products, since dividing responsibility might have limited the amount of hands-on work I had but would have brought results faster. Working mostly alone was not something we did much in past sprints, so I should have spoken up more in order to help coordinate our work.

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